CfE Briefing 17: Scots Language

These are aw staps forrit…

This briefing explores the aims and purposes of including the Scots language as part of Curriculum for Excellence. It can also be used to inform partners, learners and their parents and carers about the Scots language. It provides background information about the nature of the Scots language, along with details of the learning opportunities and benefits offered by the inclusion of Scots in the curriculum. This briefing also explores how Scots is developing across educational establishments as part of Curriculum for Excellence, within literacy and languages and across the wider curriculum.

With its various dialects, Scots forms an integral part of Scotland’s heritage and cultural life, playing a vital role in children’s and young people’s learning about Scotland. It can also make a strong contribution to the development of children’s and young people’s literacy skills. Including Scots as part of Curriculum for Excellence can help motivate some learners and their families by showing them that the language they use at home is valued. This briefing provides background information about the nature of the Scots language, the learning opportunities and benefits offered by the inclusion of Scots in the curriculum. It explores how Scots is developing across educational establishments as part of Curriculum for Excellence, within literacy and languages and across the wider curriculum.

Via Diane Anderson on FB

A bit o FB blether

‪Alan Edgey‪ The PDF airtit tae stairts by tellin us “For these reasons, most linguists and academics today agree that Scots is a language in its own right.” A bittie faurer on it tells us that “Resources such as the five different Scots versions of The Gruffalo can be used to explore not only an extensive range of vocabulary but also to study the differences and similarities within Scots language, linking directly with skills learned in English relating to word choice, register and writing for a purpose.” An syne tells us “Norwegian and Danish are different languages, but speakers of one can understand speakers of the other. Similarly, much of Scots is readily intelligible, with some practice, to an English speaker. Scots and English are sister languages, in the same way that the languages of Norway and Denmark are.” Dis Norwegian bairns learn leeteracy in Norwegian throu the medium o Danish frae beukies written mair or less phonetically uisin the soond-tae letter correspondences o Danish in an ettle tae shaw the pronunciation o a parteecular Norwegian dialect? Danish an Norwegian is really leeds in thair ain richt acause thay are treatit like leeds in their ain richt. Norwegian bairns learns (tae write) Norwegian throu the medium o Norwegian written in staundart Norwegian (Bokmål or Nynorsk) ‘ithoot ony reference tae Danish at aw. An Danes dinna tak tent tae Norwegian whan learnin tae write aither. Is Scots bairns really learnin tae write anither leed in its ain richt or juist celebratin dialect diversity as pairt o a greater English hale?

‪Diane Anderson‪ The first ane, Alan. Wi hiv tae start fae faar wi are. Wid ye wint us tae throwe oot ilka Inglis text book the morn?

‪Alan Edgey‪ Ay, awthing aye haes a stairt but whit’s the objective at the hint-end an the staps on the wey?

‪Diane Anderson‪ Government policy oot. Action plan comin seen. Hae faith.

Scroll to Top